Life Priorities

Photo: Nikolay MossolaynenWhen people move on from their physical life, we don’t remember their possessions: the things they had and owned.

We remember who they were; what they gave to us and others in terms of an uplifted feeling. It may have come through the vibrancy of their character, or the quality of their talent.

It is the person we love and hold eternally in our hearts, not their stuff.

Yet in our own lives, we obsess over gaining material wealth. We convince ourselves we ‘need’ far more than we actually do.

It is all so transient, anyway. It occurs to me that the people we love and admire, whose inspiring words we quote and deeds we desire to emulate, are often the people who own(ed) next to nothing. They were valued for their spirit and their actions.

These are our mentors, our role models, our most beloved and respected. It makes sense to shift our own personal focus from chasing money, cars, big houses and fashion statements – to being the full-on amazing person we truly are at our core.

Let’s present this Self up front and foremost.

Setting this as our top priority makes us truly rich. This is the way a single individual can illuminate the whole world.

Life Priorities © November 22, 2015 | Annie Zalezsak

Advertisements

“It Doesn’t Matter!”

Annie Zalezsak and Jacqui Cullen

Annie Zed and Jacqui Cullen recently got together for a couple of days of meaningful chat and to compare notes since their trip to Portugal. This post is Annie’s further reflection on one of the many subjects we discussed.

All Things Being Equal

Anything that makes us feel better and live better, is great! But, now we have reached a point where we realize that what we do, how we live, in the grand scheme of things, really doesn’t matter! We don’t have to be or do anything.

We Can Be Anything

We might want to be and do something in particular, but we don’t have to. It doesn’t matter. No God will chastise us. There may be human-established consequences of things done or not done; but again, from a spiritual vantage, we are all equal, accepted and always part of the whole.

Photo credit: Alexey Gostev | Dreamstime.com

Our Life is Always on Purpose

We often feel anxious about ‘fulfilling’ our ‘life purpose’. We’re concerned about being ‘authentic’ and ‘living with integrity’. We don’t want to waste our lives on trivial things. We are conscientious about materialism and the environment. We try to be charitable, tolerant, ‘good’ people. These are honourable ways to be. But whether we are these things or not, we are still ‘perfect’ exactly as we are.

We are always in the right place at the right time — whether or not our human minds can believe or accept it.

So relax into every moment, whatever shape it takes. Every moment is equal in value to the eternal soul!

Photo credit: Vvvstep | Dreamstime.com

“It Doesn’t Matter!” © November 13, 2011 | Annie Zalezsak

Our Human Family

A rare jewel among our species, Maggie Doyne has done what so many of us deeply desire: to single-handedly attempt to change the world, impact humanity, and utterly trust that the money and the means will show up to accomplish it. She inspires us to know, beyond a shadow of a doubt, that if she can do this, we are all capable of creating something similar. Let’s all remember our human family, and engage with positivite activity to connect and create a better home for us all.

 

Maggie Doyne — Why the human family can do better from The Do Lectures on Vimeo.

BEING Your Right Livelihood

As children, we’re asked: “What do you want to be when you grow up?” We may say: a fireman or a teacher, for example. These are labels that represent something we do, rather than what we are be-ing. A fireman fights fires and a teacher teaches. When we think of a job, career or even vocation, we often think of it in terms of what we do.

Neale Donald Walsch says:

So, the important thing for us to remember, when we’re searching for right livelihood, is to stop looking for something to do, and start looking for something to be. And to get in touch with that part that resides deep inside of you that knows who you really are. And see what it would take to call that forth in a beingness way.

When you meet someone new, you may say, “What do you do for a living?” We identify who we are by what we do. Is this a good thing? Or is this a misleading thing? What if we asked, “Who are you being?” I wonder how the reply might differ.

As someone who is still trying to figure out who I want to be when I grow up, I think it’s a good idea to take the word ‘be’ literally, and focus on that. That way, whatever I do is somewhat irrelevant. If my focus is on being, I can always be true to myself while doing any task.

BEING Your Right Livelihood © February 20, 2011 | Annie Zalezsak